Journal of Medical Systems

, Volume 11, Issue 6, pp 431–444 | Cite as

Automation: The competitive edge for HMOs and other Alternative Delivery Systems

  • Jeffrey A. Prussin
Articles

Abstract

Until recently, many, if not most, Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) were not automated. Moreover, HMOs that were automated tended to be automated only on a limited basis. Recently, however, the highly competitive marketplace within which HMOs and other Alternative Delivery Systems (ADS) exist has required that they operate at a maximum effectiveness and efficiency. Given the complex nature of ADSs, the volume of transactions in ADSs, the large number of members served by ADSs, and the numerous providers who are paid at different rates and on different bases by ADSs, it is impossible for an ADS to operate effectively or efficiently, let alone show optimal performance, without a sophisticated, comprehensive automated system. Reliable automated systems designed specifically to address ADS functions such as enrollment and premium billing, finance and accounting, medical information and patient management, and marketing have recently become available at a reasonable cost.

Keywords

Marketing Delivery System Optimal Performance Patient Management Automate System 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey A. Prussin
    • 1
  1. 1.From the Health Systems Development CorporationCoral Gables

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