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Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 295–310 | Cite as

A model of romantic jealousy

  • Gregory L. White
Article

Abstract

A definition of romantic jealousy is offered and imbedded within a general coping framework. Published and unpublished research is reviewed and then ordered within this framework. It is suggested that viewing jealousy as a “thing” like an emotion (anger), a behavior (competitive rivalry), or thoughts (desires for exclusivity) is incomplete. Jealousy is viewed as a label given to a complex of interrelated emotional, cognitive, and behavioral processes. New research is presented that suggests that jealousy is related to certain features of romantic relationships.

Keywords

Social Psychology Romantic Relationship Unpublished Research Behavioral Process General Coping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory L. White
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandCollege Park

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