Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 219–240 | Cite as

The facial feedback hypothesis: Methodological concerns and new supporting evidence

  • Larry L. Rutledge
  • Ralph B. Hupka
Article

Abstract

Support for the weak version of the facial feedback hypothesis has been obtained repeatedly with the dynamic pose paradigm. In contrast, support for the strong version, which is tested with the static pose paradigm, has been inconsistent. We attributed this to methodological limitations in some studies rather than to problems intrinsic to the static pose paradigm. Utilizing a methodology that improved upon the hypothesized limitations, we obtained the facial feedback effect for the static poses of joy and anger with 142 male undergraduate students. The effect was uniform across levels of stimulus intensity and stimulus affect. Facial feedback did not vary with skills in nonverbal affective communication, self-monitoring, and the ability to form mental images.

Keywords

Social Psychology Undergraduate Student Stimulus Intensity Supporting Evidence Methodological Limitation 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry L. Rutledge
    • 1
  • Ralph B. Hupka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityLong Beach

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