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Research in Higher Education

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 315–322 | Cite as

Programmed student achievement: A Hawthorne Effect?

  • Nabil F. Haddad
  • Jack R. Nation
  • Jerry D. Williams
Article

Abstract

Three groups of college students were given instructions using different testing techniques to determine whether the superior performance obtained with Programmed Student Achievement (PA) was due to a Hawthorne Effect. PA students, operating under the consequence of failing the course if they failed to evidence criterion performance (100% mastery) on weekly quizzes, exhibited superior performance, relative to control groups, on the weekly quizzes and on an unannounced retention test. The results seem to preclude any attempt to interpret the effectiveness of Programmed Student Achievement on the basis of a Hawthorne Effect.

Keywords

College Student Superior Performance Education Research Criterion Performance Student Achievement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Knight, J. M. (1973). The effect of programmed achievement on student performance. Journal of Educational Research 66(7): 291–294.Google Scholar
  2. Knight, J. M., Williams, J. D., and Jardon, M. (1975). The effects of contingency avoidance on programmed student achievement. Research in Higher Education, 3: 11–17.Google Scholar
  3. Nation, J. R., Knight, J. M., Lamberth, J., and Dyck, D. G. (1974). Programmed student achievement: A test of the avoidance hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Education (in press).Google Scholar
  4. Whaley, D. L., and Malott, R. W. (1971). “Elementary Principles of Behavior.” New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© APS Publications, Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nabil F. Haddad
    • 1
  • Jack R. Nation
    • 2
  • Jerry D. Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of OklahomaNorman
  2. 2.Texas A & M UniversityUSA

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