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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 759–770 | Cite as

Apparatus and procedure for measuring release rates from formulations of lepidopteran semiochemicals

  • John H. Cross
  • James H. Tumlinson
  • Robert E. Heath
  • Donald E. Burnett
Article

Abstract

An apparatus was developed wherein a vacuum source was used to pull air across a controlled-release-formulation dispenser or a planchet containing a known quantity of a semiochemical and into a collector filled with a polymeric adsorbent. After a set time, the semiochemical was eluted with solvent and was quantified by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). High percentages of known quantities of the lepidopteran semiochemicals (Z)-7-dodecen-l -ol acetate (Z7DDA), boiling point (bp) 275 ° C/1 atm, (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol formate (Z9TDF), bp 289 °C/1 atm, and (Z,Z)-3,13-octadecadien-1-ol acetate (ZZODDA), bp 490 °C/1 atm, were recovered. The semiochemicals did not oxidize and were recovered quantitatively from the adsorbent. The release rates of Z9TDF from a controlled-release dispenser were found to be directly proportional to the airflow rates. Release rate measurements on the Z9TDF dispensers were made for the purpose of estimating the method's precision. The method was shown to give internally consistent results by measurements on another Z9TDF formulation. The accuracy of the method is discussed.

Key words

Controlled release formulations release rate pheromone semiochemical 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Cross
    • 1
  • James H. Tumlinson
    • 1
  • Robert E. Heath
    • 1
  • Donald E. Burnett
    • 1
  1. 1.Insect Attractants, Behavior, and Basic Biology Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research, Science and Education AdministrationUSDAGainesville

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