Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 5, Issue 6, pp 909–918 | Cite as

Attraction of nematodes to metabolites of yeasts and fungi

  • J. BalanovÁ
  • J. Balan
  • L. Kŕižková
  • P. Nemec
  • D. Bobok
Article

Abstract

The free-living nematodesPanagrellus redivivus andRhabditis oxycerca are strongly attracted to methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, and amyl acetate, to ethyl, propyl, and amyl formate and to ethyl propionate, but all the respective alcohols and acids are without effect. No loss of attraction is observed when the attractants are combined with lethal concentrations of the commercial nematicide sodium methyl dithiocarbamate.

Key words

Attractants nematodes Panagrellus redivivus Rhabditis oxycerca Saccharomyces cerevisiae predacious fungi methyl acetate ethyl acetate propyl acetate butyl acetate amyl acetate ethyl formate propyl formate amyl formate ethyl propionate sodium methyl dithiocarbamate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. BalanovÁ
    • 1
  • J. Balan
    • 1
  • L. Kŕižková
    • 1
  • P. Nemec
    • 1
  • D. Bobok
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological Properties of Low Molecular Weight SubstancesSlovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Molecular BiologyBratislavaCzechoslovakia
  2. 2.Department of Chemical EngineeringSlovak Polytechnical University School of ChemistryBratislavaCzechoslovakia

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