Advertisement

Philosophical Studies

, Volume 71, Issue 2, pp 163–190 | Cite as

The connectionism/classicism battle to win souls

  • Brian P. McLaughlin
Article

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Antony, M. (1991) Fodor and Pylyshyn on connectionism.Minds and Machines 1, pp. 321–341.Google Scholar
  2. Bechtel, W. and Abrahamsen, A. (1991)Connectionism and the Mind: An Introduction to Parallel Processing in Networks. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  3. Bechtel, W. (1991) Connectionism and the philosophy of mind: An overview. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991), pp. 30–59.Google Scholar
  4. Bever, T. G., Fodor, J. A. and Weksel, W. (1965) Theoretical notes on the acquisition of syntax: A critique of ‘contextual generalization’.Psychological Review 72(6), pp. 467–482.Google Scholar
  5. Block, N. (1982)Imagery. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  6. Braine, M. (1963) On learning the grammatical order of words.Psychological Review 70, pp. 323–348.Google Scholar
  7. Broadbent, D. (1985) A question of levels: Comments on McClelland and Rumelhart.Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114, pp. 89–192.Google Scholar
  8. Chalmers, D. J. (1990) Syntactic transformations on distributed representations.Connection Science 2, pp. 53–62.Google Scholar
  9. Chalmers, D. J. (1991) Why Fodor and Pylyshyn were wrong: The simplest refutation. Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, pp. 340–347.Google Scholar
  10. Chomsky, N. (1957)Syntactic Structures. The Hague: Mouton.Google Scholar
  11. Churchland, P. S. (1986)Neurophilosophy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  12. Churchland, P. S. and Sejnowski, T. J. (1990) Neural representation and neural computation.Philosophical Perspectives 4, pp. 343–382.Google Scholar
  13. Clark, A. (1988a) Thoughts, sentences and cognitive science.Philosophical Psychology 1, pp. 263–278.Google Scholar
  14. Clark, A. (1988b)Microcognition. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  15. Clark, A. (1991) Systematicity, structured representations and cognitive architecture: A reply to Fodor and Pylyshyn. In: Horgan and Tienson, pp. 198–218.Google Scholar
  16. Cummins, R. (1983)The Nature of Psychological Explanation. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  17. Cummins, R. and Schwarz, G. (1991) Connectionism, computation, and cognition. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 60–73.Google Scholar
  18. Dennett, D. (1991) Mother nature versus the walking encyclopedia: A western dilemma. In: Ramsey et al. (1991), pp. 21–30.Google Scholar
  19. Dretske, F. (1988)Explaining Behavior: Reasons in a World of Causes. Cambridge, MA: Bradford/MIT Press.Google Scholar
  20. Dyer, M. G. (1991) Connectionism versus symbolism in higher-level cognition. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 382–416.Google Scholar
  21. Elman, J.L. (1989) Representation and structure in connectionist models. CRL Technical Report 8903.Google Scholar
  22. Feldman, J. A. and Ballard D. H. (1982) Connectionist models and their properties.Cognitive Science 6, pp. 205–254.Google Scholar
  23. Fodor, J. A. (1976)The Language of Thought. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Fodor, J. A. (1982) Imagistic representation. In: Block (1982), pp. 63–86.Google Scholar
  25. Fodor, J. A. and Pylyshyn, Z. W. (1988) Connectionism and cognitive architecture: A critical analysis.Cognition 28, pp. 3–71.Google Scholar
  26. Fodor, J. A. and McLaughlin, B. P. (1990) Connectionism and the problem of systematicity: Why Smolensky's solution doesn't work.Cognition 35, pp. 183–204.Google Scholar
  27. Fodor, J. A. (1990)A Theory of Content and Other Essays. Cambridge, MA: Bradford/MIT Press.Google Scholar
  28. Fodor, J. A. (1991) Replies. In: Loewer and Rey (1991), pp. 255–320.Google Scholar
  29. Forrester, M. and Saidel, E. (Forthcoming) Connectionism and the fate of folk psychology: A reply to Ramsey, Stich, and Garon.Philosophical Psychology.Google Scholar
  30. Franklin, S. and Garzon, M. (Forthcoming) Neural network implementation of a Turing machine.Google Scholar
  31. Hale, K. (1983) Walpiri and the grammar of nonconfigurational languages.Natural Language and Linguistic Theory, Vol. I, no. 1, pp. 5–47.Google Scholar
  32. Harris, Z. (1957) Co-occurrence and transformation in linguistic structure.Language 33, pp. 283–340.Google Scholar
  33. Haugeland, J. (1985)Artificial Intelligence: The Very Idea. Cambridge, MA: Bradford/MIT Press.Google Scholar
  34. Horgan, T. (1991) Review ofMicrocognition. Mind, pp. 290–293.Google Scholar
  35. Horgan, T. and Tienson, J. (1992) Structured representations in connectionist systems? In: S. Davis (ed.)Connectionism: Theory and Practice. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  36. Horgan, T. and Tienson, J. (1991a)Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  37. Horgan, T. and Tienson, J. (1991b) Settling into a new paradigm. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 241–260.Google Scholar
  38. Katz, J. J. and Postal, P. M. (1964)An Integrated Theory of Linguistic Descriptions Research Monograph no. 26. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  39. Loewer, B. and Rey, G. (1991)Meaning in Mind: Fodor and His Critics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  40. Lloyd, D. (1991) Leaping to conclusions: Connectionism, consciousness, and the computational mind. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 444–459.Google Scholar
  41. Matthews, R. (1991) Is there vindication through representationalism? In: Loewer and Rey (eds.), pp. 137–150.Google Scholar
  42. McClelland, J. and Rumelhart, D. (1986)Parallel Distributed Processing, Vols. 1 & 2. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  43. McGinn, C. (1989)Mental Content. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  44. McLaughlin, B. P. (1987) Tye on connectionism.Southern Journal of Philosophy 26, Spindel Conference on Connectionism, pp. 185–193.Google Scholar
  45. McLaughlin, B. P. (1990) Why perception is not singular reference. In: John Heil (ed.)Cause, Mind, and Reality. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  46. McLaughlin, B. P. (Forthcoming) Systematicity, conceptual truth, and evolution. In: C. Hookway and D. Peterson (eds.)Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Royal Institute of Philosophy, Supplement no. 34.Google Scholar
  47. McLaughlin, B. P. and Warfield, T. (Forthcoming) The allures of connectionism reexamined.Synthese.Google Scholar
  48. Millikan, R. (1984)Language, Thought and Other Biological Categories. Cambridge, MA: Bradford/MIT Press.Google Scholar
  49. Pinker, S. and Prince, A. (1988) On language and connectionism: analysis of a parallel distributed processing model of language acquisition.Cognition 28, pp. 73–193.Google Scholar
  50. Pollack, J. (1990) Recursive distributed representations.Artificial Intelligence 46, pp. 77–105.Google Scholar
  51. Pylyshyn, Z. (1984)Computation and Cognition. A Bradford Book.Google Scholar
  52. Ramsey, W., Stich, S. and Rumelhart, D. (eds.) (1991)Philosophy and Connectionist Theory. Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  53. Ramsey, W., Stich, S. P. and Rumelhart, D. E. (1991)Connectionism and the Philosophy of Mind. Erlbaum: Hillsdale.Google Scholar
  54. Rey, G. (1991) An explanatory budget for connectionism and eliminativism. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 219–240.Google Scholar
  55. Schiffer, S. (1991) Does mentalese have a compositional semantics? In: Loewer and Rey (1991), pp. 181–200.Google Scholar
  56. Schneider, W. (1987) Connectionism: Is it a paradigm shift for psychology?Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers 19, pp. 73–83.Google Scholar
  57. Searle, J. (1992)The Rediscovery of the Mind. Cambridge, MA: Bradford/MIT Press.Google Scholar
  58. Smolensky, P. (1991a) Connectionism, constituency and the language of thought. In: Loewer, B. and Rey, G. (eds.) (1991),Meaning in Mind: Fodor and His Critics. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  59. Smolensky, P. (1991b) The constituent structure of connectionist mental states: A reply to Fodor and Pylyshyn. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 281–308.Google Scholar
  60. Stephan, A. (in manuscript) Freudian associationist processes and connectionism.Google Scholar
  61. Sterelny, K. (1990)The Representational Theory of the Mind. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  62. Tienson, J. (1991) Introduction. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 1–29.Google Scholar
  63. Touretzky, D. S. and Hinton, G. E. (1988) A distributed connectionist production system.Cognitive Science 12, pp. 423–466.Google Scholar
  64. Van Gelder, T. (1990) Compositionality: A connectionist variation on a classical theme.Cognitive Science 14, pp. 355–384.Google Scholar
  65. Van Gelder, T. (1991a) Classical questions, radical answers: Connectionism and the structure of mental representations. In: Horgan and Tienson (1991a), pp. 355–381.Google Scholar
  66. Van Gelder, T. (1991b) What is the ‘D’ in ‘PDP’? A survey of the concept of distribution. In: Ramsey, Stich, and Rumelhart (1991), pp. 33–60.Google Scholar
  67. Warfield, T. (in manuscript) Horgan and Tienson on the systematicity argument.Google Scholar
  68. Wittgenstein, L. (1961) G. H. Von Wright and G. E. M. Anscombe (eds.)Notebooks 1914–1916. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian P. McLaughlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

Personalised recommendations