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Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 253–267 | Cite as

Nonverbal behavior and gender as determinants of physical attractiveness

  • Robert S. Raines
  • Sarah B. Hechtman
  • Robert Rosenthal
Article

Abstract

We investigated the combined and interacting effects of positivity, dominance, sex, and three nonverbal channels on the perception of physical attractiveness. We found that positive affects were rated as more attractive than negative affects regardless of the channel (face and voice, as well as body). We also found that physical attractiveness in females appeared to be a function of the face and body combined, whereas for males it appeared more to be a function of the face alone.

Keywords

Social Psychology Nonverbal Behavior Physical Attractiveness Nonverbal Channel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert S. Raines
  • Sarah B. Hechtman
  • Robert Rosenthal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyHarvard UniversityCambridge

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