Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 4, Issue 5, pp 613–622 | Cite as

Short-chain aliphatic acids in the interdigital gland secretion of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.), and their discrimination by reindeer

  • Anders Brundin
  • Gustav Andersson
  • Kurt Andersson
  • Torgny Mossing
  • Lollo Källquist
Article

Abstract

Interdigital gland secretion from reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) was analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromato-graphy. The short-chain acid fraction consisted of acetic, propionic, isobutyric,n-butyric, isovaleric, 2-methylbutyric,n-valeric, isocaproic, andn-caproic acids. The short-chain acids were produced by sterol esters when hydrolyzed in the gland-probably by microorganisms. Triglycerides present did not contain any short-chain acids. By testing isovaleric acid and isobutyric acid applied on small filter papers placed in a pen and measuring the number of sniffings on and towards the samples, we elicited good response at 1 ng application compared with the blanks, while pivalic acid gave no response under the same conditions.

Key words

reindeer skin glands interdigital gland fatty acids sterol esters 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anders Brundin
    • 1
  • Gustav Andersson
    • 1
  • Kurt Andersson
    • 1
  • Torgny Mossing
    • 2
  • Lollo Källquist
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Organic ChemistryUniversity of UmeåUmeåSweden
  2. 2.Department of Ecological ZoologyUniversity of UmeåUmeåSweden

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