Qualitative Sociology

, Volume 11, Issue 1–2, pp 99–112 | Cite as

Qualitative sociology in New Zealand

  • Sharon Mast
Articles

Conclusion

It can be argued that qualitative research has become more popular in New Zealand in recent years. If this is so, then researchers in diverse subfields of sociology may come to develop an awareness of their common interests, thus fostering the growth of qualitative sociology as a basis of occupational identification. However, many of the developments which have bearing on the state of qualitative sociology in New Zealand (e.g., a local journal, funding agencies and research centres) have only been recently established. It is therefore too early, perhaps, to assess the future role of qualitative sociology in New Zealand scholarship. Nevertheless, the preceding discussion has demonstrated the existence of a lively research scene, much of it qualitative, which exists in New Zealand at present.

Keywords

Social Psychology Qualitative Research Research Centre Social Issue Cross Cultural Psychology 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Baker, C. 1983 “The ‘age of consent’ controversy: Age and gender as social practice.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Sociology 19:96–112.Google Scholar
  2. Barrington, R. & Gray, A. 1981 The Smith Women: 100 New Zealand Women Talk About Their Lives. Wellington: Reed.Google Scholar
  3. Bassett, G. 1984 “Screen-play and real-play: Manufacturing sport on television.” Sites 11:5–31.Google Scholar
  4. Burgess, R. 1984 In the Field: An Introduction to Field Research. London: George Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  5. Chapple, D.L. 1976 Tokoroa: Creating a Community. Auckland: Longman Paul.Google Scholar
  6. Cordery, G. 1985 “‘Tom Brown's schooldays’ and ‘Foreskin's Lament’: The alpha and omega of rugby football.” Journal of Popular Culture 19:97–105.Google Scholar
  7. Crawford, Scott A.G.M. 1985 “The game of ‘glory and hard knocks’: A study of the interpenetration of rugby and New Zealand society.” Journal of Popular Culture 19:77–91.Google Scholar
  8. Crothers, C. & Gribben C. 1986 “The state of New Zealand sociology: Some preliminary observations.” New Zealand Sociology 1:1–17.Google Scholar
  9. Fenwick, P. 1984 “Feminist research and research on women: The response of the state.” In Hilary Haines (Ed.). Women's Studies: Conference Papers '83. Pp. 18–27. Auckland: Women's Studies Assn. (NZ) Inc.Google Scholar
  10. Fougere, G. 1981 “Barbed wire and riot squads: What is being defended?” New Zealand Cultural Studies Working Group Newsletter 2:2–5.Google Scholar
  11. Gray, A. 1986 “Editorial.” Social Sciences Research Fund Committee Newsletter 7 (1):2–4.Google Scholar
  12. Hall, B., Thorns, D. & Willmott, B. 1983 Community formation and change: A study of rural and urban localities in New Zealand. Dept. of Sociology, U. of Canterbury Working Paper No. 4.Google Scholar
  13. Hill, R. 1984a “From hot metal to cold type: New technology in the Newspaper industry.” New Zealand Journal of Industrial Relations 9:161–75.Google Scholar
  14. Hill, R. 1984b “Establishing validity in the social sciences: An empirical illustration.” New Zealand Science Review 41:59–62.Google Scholar
  15. Hill, R. 1985 “Fieldwork as a female in a ‘male’ workplace: The process of gender at work.” In Claire Philipson (Ed.). Women's studies: Conference Papers '84. Pp. 118–28. Auckland: Women's Studies Assn. (NZ) Inc.Google Scholar
  16. James, B. 1984 “Editorial.” New Zealand Cultural Studies Working Group Journal 8:3–4.Google Scholar
  17. James, B. 1986 “Taking gender into account: Feminist and sociological issues in social research.” New Zealand Sociology 1:18–33.Google Scholar
  18. King R.J.R. 1985 “Review of Robert Burgess, In the field: An introduction to field research.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Sociology 21:317–19.Google Scholar
  19. Lofland, J. 1971 Analyzing Social Settings. Belmont: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  20. Maharey, S. 1981 “Editorial.” New Zealand Cultural Studies Working Group Newsletter 1:1–2.Google Scholar
  21. Middleton, S. 1984 “On being a feminist educationist doing research on being a feminist educationist: Life history analysis as consciousness raising.” New Zealand Cultural Studies Working Group Journal 8:29–37.Google Scholar
  22. Novitz, R. 1982 “Feminism.” In Paul Spoonley, David Pearson & Ian Shirley (Eds.). New Zealand: Sociological Perspectives. Pp. 293–323. Palmerston North: The Dunmore Press.Google Scholar
  23. Oakley, A. 1981 “Interviewing women: A contradiction in terms.” In Helen Roberts (Ed.). Doing Feminist Research. Pp. 30–61. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
  24. Older, J. 1985 “New Zealand coaches' attitudes to preevent sex.” Journal of Popular Culture 19:93–6.Google Scholar
  25. Pearson, D. 1980 Johnsonville: Continuity and Change in a New Zealand Township. Sydney: George Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  26. Pearson, D. 1985 Why do you want to study a place like that for?: Reflections on Johnsonville. Unpublished paper.Google Scholar
  27. Perry, N. 1981 “Progressive emancipation and the negotiation of disenchantment: An ethnography of New Zealand office workers.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Sociology 17:41–49.Google Scholar
  28. Perry, N. 1985 “Common coinage: Telethon and cultural criticism in New Zealand.” Journal of Popular Culture 19:137–48.Google Scholar
  29. Pitt, David C., & MacPherson, C. 1974 Emerging Pluralism. Auckland: Longman Paul.Google Scholar
  30. Plummer, K. 1983 Documents of Life: An Introduction to the Problems and Literature of a Humanistic Method. London: Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  31. Robb, J.H. & Crothers, C.H.G. 1985 New Zealand. In Yogesh Atal, (Ed.). Sociology and Social Anthropology in Asia and the Pacific. Pp. 460–508. New Delhi: Wiley Eastern.Google Scholar
  32. Schatzman, L. & Strauss, A. 1973 Field Research: Strategies for a Natural Sociology. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  33. Schwartz, H. & Jacobs, J. 1979 Qualitative Sociology: A Method to the Madness. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  34. Shipley, S. 1984 “Doing feminist sociological research: Its politics and practice.” In Hilary Haines (Ed.). Women's Studies: Conference Papers '83. Pp. 11–13. Auckland: Women's Studies Assn. (NZ) Inc.Google Scholar
  35. Sites 1984 “Journal policy.” Sites 9:84–5.Google Scholar
  36. Somerset, H.C.D. 1938 Littledene: A New Zealand Community. Wellington: New Zealand Council for Educational Research.Google Scholar
  37. Society for Research on Women in New Zealand 1973 Employers' Attitudes: Work Opportunity for Women. Wellington: SROWGoogle Scholar
  38. Society for Research on Women in New Zealand. 1975 Solo Mothers, Christchurch: SROW.Google Scholar
  39. Society for Research on Women in New Zealand 1976 Career, Marriage and Family: Report of a Survey. Wellington: SROW.Google Scholar
  40. Wild, R. A. 1981 Australian Community Studies and Beyond. Sydney: George Allen & Unwin.Google Scholar
  41. Wood, B. 1981 “Research in progress: The production of political television.” New Zealand Cultural Studies Working Group Newsletter 1:5.Google Scholar
  42. Wood, B. 1982 Smashing the audience. Unpublished M.A. Thesis, Massey University.Google Scholar
  43. Wood, B. 1984 Smashing the audience: An analysis of New Zealand political television. Monograph No. 1. Palmerston North: New Zealand Cultural Studies Working Group & Massey U. Dept. of Sociology.Google Scholar
  44. Yates, L. 1984 “Review of Ken Plummer. Documents of life: An introduction to the problems and literature of a humanistic method.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Sociology 20:436–38.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Mast
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Social WorkVictoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations