Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 113–118 | Cite as

Field trapping of diamondback mothPlutella xylostella using an improved four-component sex attractant blend

  • M. D. Chisholm
  • W. F. Steck
  • E. W. Underhill
  • P. Palaniswamy
Article

Abstract

In addition to three known sex lure components [(Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, and (Z)-11-hexadecenol], (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate was field-proven as a trace coattractant for malePlutella xylostella, with an optimal content below 0.01% in blends. This potent four-component lure for diamondback males also attractedCrymodes devastator males, and in this respect is not different in its attractancy from virgin diamondback females. Replacement of (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate in the four component lure with (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol, at the level of 10% of the total lure mixture, did not alter its attractancy for diamondback males, but it did inhibit attraction ofCrymodes devastator. The status of biologically active components as possible sex pheromones or para-pheromones is discussed.

Key words

Diamondback moth Plutella xylostella Crymodes devastator Lepidoptera Yponomeutidae Noctuidae sex attractant (Z)-11-hexadecenyl acetate (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol (Z)-11-hexadecenal (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetate (Z)-9-tetradecen-1-ol 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Chisholm
    • 1
  • W. F. Steck
    • 1
  • E. W. Underhill
    • 1
  • P. Palaniswamy
    • 1
  1. 1.Prairie Regional LaboratoryNational Research Council of CanadaSaskatoonCanada

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