Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 2, Issue 2, pp 201–209 | Cite as

2,6-Dichlorophenol, the sex pheromone of the Rocky Mountain wood tick,Dermacentor andersoni Stiles and the American dog tick,Dermacentor variabilis (Say)

  • Daniel E. Sonenshine
  • Robert M. Silverstein
  • Ernest Plummer
  • Janet R. West
  • Thomas McCullough
Article

Abstract

2,6-Dichlorophenol is the only active sex attractant component detected in the extracts of the Rocky Mountain wood tick,Dermacentor andersoni Stiles and the American dog tick,Dermacentor variabilis (Say). It elicits from the male of each species a hierarchy of responses culminating in copulation. This compound probably occurs generally throughout the metastriate Ixodidae. 2,6-Dibromophenol, an artifact, also elicits the same sexual responses from the wood tick, but phenol andp-cresol do not.

Key words

Rocky Mountain wood tick dog tick Dermacentor andersoni Dermacentor variabilis sex pheromone 2,6-dichlorophenol 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel E. Sonenshine
    • 1
  • Robert M. Silverstein
    • 2
  • Ernest Plummer
    • 2
  • Janet R. West
    • 2
  • Thomas McCullough
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesOld Dominion UniversityNorfolk
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryCollege of Environmental Science and Forestry State University of New YorkSyracuse

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