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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 7, Issue 6, pp 961–968 | Cite as

A high-efficiency collection device for quantifying sex pheromone volatilized from female glands and synthetic sources

  • T. C. Baker
  • L. K. Gaston
  • M. Mistrot Pope
  • L. P. S. Kuenen
  • R. S. Vetter
Article

Abstract

A high-efficiency collection device for sex pheromones volatized from forcibly extruded female glands is described. Filtered nitrogen gas is the carrier and glass wool the adsorbent. Small quantities of distilled carbon disulfide are used to rinse the glass wool. Recovery efficiency of synthetic compounds was usually 90–100%, and a mean of 2.4 ± 0.65 SD ng/min of (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate was recovered in emissions from individualTrichoplusia ni (Hubner) glands.

Key words

Volatilized pheromone glass adsorption Trichoplusia ni cabbage looper quantifying pheromone emission 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. C. Baker
    • 1
  • L. K. Gaston
    • 1
  • M. Mistrot Pope
    • 1
  • L. P. S. Kuenen
    • 1
  • R. S. Vetter
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Toxicology and Physiology, Department of EntomologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiverside

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