Qualitative Sociology

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 186–203 | Cite as

Sex education from 1900 to 1920: A study of ideological social control

  • Kenneth Rosow
  • Caroline Hodges Persell
Article
  • 86 Downloads

Abstract

The emergence of a campaign during the first two decades of this century to provide public information on sexual matters is analyzed as a social issue. The creation of sex education programs in the public schools, the role of government in disseminating literature on venereal disease, the founding of professional organizations concerned with the field of sexuality, and the widespread discussion of social and sexual hygiene in journals and books are evidence of a transformation of the subject of sexuality from a private concern to a public issue.

Keywords

Social Psychology Education Program Public School Social Issue Social Control 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth Rosow
    • 1
  • Caroline Hodges Persell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyNew York University

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