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, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 345–369 | Cite as

Child support guidelines: Economic theory and policy considerations

  • Barbara R. Rowe
Article

Abstract

Federal legislation has mandated that all states develop numeric guidelines for child support awards in divorce and paternity suits. The purpose of this article is to review the theoretical models currently used in guidelines development and to present an analysis of issues pertinent to the development and use of guidelines. A familiarity with the principles underlying child support guidelines will assist family scientists who may be called upon to provide expertise on this public policy issue.

Key words

Child Support Divorce Family Policy-Making Support Guidelines 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara R. Rowe
    • 1
  1. 1.Utah State UniversityUSA

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