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Religion and health relationships: A review

Abstract

This review examines various studies showing the relation between religiosity (religious beliefs and/or practices) and health. It also includes church attendance and its relation to drug use. The role of the church in health promotion is discussed, with examples of church intervention model programs. Several attempts have been made to measure religiosity and religious commitment, but as yet little has been done to identify specific dimensions of religion as they relate to health behaviors. Even though the literature indicates that religion is generally associated with health behaviors, health status, and longevity, further research on the specifics of this relationship is needed.

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He has been doing research on the relation between religion and health for the past five years.

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King, D.G. Religion and health relationships: A review. J Relig Health 29, 101–112 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00986405

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Keywords

  • Health Status
  • Health Promotion
  • Health Behavior
  • Specific Dimension
  • Model Program