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Journal of Religion and Health

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 187–195 | Cite as

Archetypes and patriarchy: Eliade and Jung

  • Mary Jo Meadow
Article

Abstract

This paper first presents the understandings of the concept of archetype held by Carl Jung and Mircea Eliade. After comparing their use of the term, the paper next presents some major archetypes concerning sex roles that each theorist describes. The problems such notions create for women are analyzed. The paper ends with a discussion of some possible solutions to the difficulties caused by the human proclivity for archetypal imaging.

Keywords

Human Proclivity Archetypal Imaging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Eliade, M.,The Myth of the Eternal Return. New York, Princeton University Press, 1954, pp. xiv, xv. All citations from paper edition, 1971.Google Scholar
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    This paper was originally presented for the History of Christianity Section at the annual meeting of The American Academy of Religion.Google Scholar
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    Eliade, M.,The Myth of the Eternal Return, op. cit.;The Sacred and the Profane. New York, Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc., 1959 (originally published in French and German, 1957);Patterns in Comparative Religion. New York, Sheed & Ward, 1958. All citations from Meridian Books edition, 1974;Myth and Reality. New York, Harper & Row, 1963. All citations from Colophon paper edition, 1975.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Institutes of Religion and Health 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Jo Meadow
    • 1
  1. 1.State University in MankatoMinnesota

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