Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 19, Issue 11, pp 2501–2512 | Cite as

Responses of maxillary sensilla styloconica inBombyx mori to glucosides fromOsmunda japonica, a nonhost plant

  • Toshiaki Shimizu
  • Mitsuo Yazawa
  • Tsuneo Hirao
  • Narihiko Arai
Article
  • 54 Downloads

Abstract

We isolated glucosides from the royal fern,Osmunda japonica, which elicit a deterrent response in larvae ofBombyx mori. These compounds were absent in taro (Colocasia antiquorum) and castor-oil plant (Ricinus communis) leaves and did not evoke responses of sensory cells in the lateral and medial sensilla styloconica ofSpodoptera litura. This glucoside extract of the royal fern leaves stimulates receptors generally associated with deterrent. It is also possible that this compound may act as a behavioral deterrent, and from actual feeding tests, it is suggested that this compound may prevent feeding in some monophagous insects, such asBombyx mori. The deterrent glucoside possesses a noncyclic aglycon.

Key words

Bombyx mori Lepidoptera Bombicidae Noctuidae Spodoptera litura sensilla styloconica royal fern Osmunda japonica electrophysiological response 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Toshiaki Shimizu
    • 1
  • Mitsuo Yazawa
    • 1
  • Tsuneo Hirao
    • 2
  • Narihiko Arai
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Insect Physiology and BehaviorThe National Institute of Sericulture and Insect ScienceIbarakiJapan
  2. 2.The National Institute of Agrobiological ResourcesIbarakiJapan

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