Research in Higher Education

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 139–154 | Cite as

The success rate of personal salary negotiations: A further investigation of academic pay differentials by sex

  • Cynthia De Riemer
  • Dan R. Quarles
  • Charles M. Temple
Article

Abstract

A sample of male and female assistant professors in land grant public institutions was mailed a questionnaire regarding their past salary negotiation activities and their perceptions of the academic reward system. The survey results indicated that male and female academicians have about the same tendency to attempt a salary negotiation both for beginning salaries and for salary increases. Females were found to be as successful as the males in negotiating initial salaries and more successful in negotiating salary increases. The females and males studied also showed marked agreement on their perceptions of the academic reward system. However, females also reported feelings of pay inequality when they compared themselves to their peers, particularly peers of the opposite sex.

Keywords

Success Rate Assistant Professor Education Research Survey Result Public Institution 

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Copyright information

© Agathon Press, Inc 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia De Riemer
    • 1
  • Dan R. Quarles
    • 1
  • Charles M. Temple
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Tennessee at ChattanoogaUSA

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