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The structural and functional heterogeneity of glutamic acid decarboxylase: A review

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Abstract

Studies of the GABA-synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (glutamic acid decarboxylase; GAD; E.C.4.1.1.15) began in 1951 with the work of Roberts and his colleagues. Since then, many investigators have demonstrated the structural and functional heterogeneity of brain GAD. At least part of this heterogeneity derives from the existence of two GAD genes.

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In honor of the 70th birthday of Dr. Eugene Roberts

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Erlander, M.G., Tobin, A.J. The structural and functional heterogeneity of glutamic acid decarboxylase: A review. Neurochem Res 16, 215–226 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00966084

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