Neurochemical Research

, Volume 9, Issue 11, pp 1667–1671 | Cite as

On the measurement of glucose in brain: A comment to Sacks et al. (1983)

  • Albert Gjedde
Comment

Abstract

The measurements reported by Sacks et al. (4) were examined critically and shown to be faulty. When performed correctly, the measurements yielded results that correspond closely to those predicted by the model of the brain uptake of 2-deoxyglucose formulated by Sokoloff et al. (5).

Keywords

Glucose Brain Uptake 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Gjedde, A. 1982. Calculation of cerebral glucose phosphorylation from brain uptake of glucose analogs in vivo: A reexamination. Brain Res. Rev. 4:237–274.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lowry, O. H., Passoneau, J. V., Hasselberger, F. X., andSchulz, D. W. 1964. Effect of ischemia on known substrates and cofactors of the glycolytic pathway in brain. J. Biol. Chem. 239:18–30.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Robin, E. D., Murphy, B. J., Theodore, J. 1984. Coordinate regulation of glycolysis by hypoxia in mammalian cells. J. Cell Physiol. 118:287–290.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sacks, W., Sacks, S., Fleischer, A. 1983. A comparison of the cerebral uptake and metabolism of labeled glucose and deoxyglucose in vivo in rats. Neurochem. Res. 8:661–685.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sokoloff, L., Reivich, M., Kennedy, C., Des Rosiers, M. H., Patlak, C. S., Pettigrew, K. D., Sakurada, O., andShinohara, M. 1977. The (14C)deoxyglucose method for the measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization: Theory, procedure, and normal values in the conscious and anesthetized albino rat. J. Neurochem. 28:897–916.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Gjedde
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Physiology Department A The Panum InstituteCopenhagen UniversityCopenhagenDenmark

Personalised recommendations