Changes induced by eccentric training on force-velocity relationships of the elbow flexor muscles

  • A. Martin
  • L. Martin
  • B. Morion
Short Communication

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a short term eccentric training period on force-velocity relationships of the elbow flexor muscles. From a muscle model, the maximal shortening velocity VO(x) and the af parameter which varies according to the curvature of the force-velocity relationship of the muscle were determined. Sixteen volunteer subjects divided into 2 groups participated in this study (Group Eccentric GE, n=8 . Group Control GC, n=8). The subjects performed, on an isokinetic ergometer, 2 maximal concentric elbow flexions at different angular velocities (60, 120, 180; 240, 300, 360 °s−1) and held maximal and submaximal isometric actions at an elbow flexion angle of 90°. Under isometric conditions, myoelectrical activity (EMG) of the biceps was recorded and quantified as a RMS value. All tests were performed before and after training sessions. Training was conducted 3 times a week for 4 weeks by the GE, and included 6×5 eccentric actions with a load of 100% of 1 RM. After training and for the GE, the af parameter and Vo(x) increased significantly (p<0.05). These changes were accompanied by a significant increase (p<0.05) of the RMS value of the maximal isometric action. This evolution towards faster characteristics for the elbow flexor muscles after training could be partly due to nervous adaptation.

Key words

Muscle model Eccentric training Surface electromyography. 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Martin
    • 1
  • L. Martin
    • 1
  • B. Morion
    • 1
  1. 1.Groupe Analyse du MouvementUniversité de BourgogneDijon CedexFrance

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