Psychopathology subtypes and symptom correlates among former prisoners of war

  • Patricia B. Sutker
  • Daniel K. Winstead
  • Kenneth C. Goist
  • Robert M. Malow
  • Albert N. AllainJr.
Article

Abstract

Psychopathology and symptom patterns were studied in 60 former prisoners-of-war (POWs) by administering standardized tests including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), an adjustment problem checklist, and a structured clinical interview. Most POWs showed marked psychological impairment, but modal profile analysis identified two prototypic MMPI patterns, which differed in pervasiveness and type of psychopathology. Profile subtypes were defined by unique clusters of clinical symptoms and differed in confinement stress severity. The typology of symptoms argues against a homogeneous conceptualization of stress-induced disorders and suggests the need for definition of the severity and subtype of stress phenomena and individual difference factors in responding to trauma.

Key words

posttraumatic stress disorder ex-prisoners of war chronic stress psychopathology 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia B. Sutker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniel K. Winstead
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kenneth C. Goist
    • 2
  • Robert M. Malow
    • 1
    • 2
  • Albert N. AllainJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterNew Orleans
  2. 2.Tulane University School of MedicineNew Orleans

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