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Polymer Bulletin

, Volume 35, Issue 3, pp 379–386 | Cite as

The evaluation of the state of dispersion in immiscible blends where the minor phase exhibits fractionated crystallization

  • R. A. Morales
  • M. L. Arnal
  • A. J. Müller
Article

Summary

Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) can provide a qualitative measure of the state of dispersion of an immiscible blend if the minor phase exhibits fractionated crystallization when dispersed into fine particles. The technique is only sensitive to the volume of the dispersed particle and not to its shape and can only be used when the exotherms of interest do not overlap with other thermal transitions present in the multicomponent system. Selfnucleation is a valuable tool to ascertain the presence of fractionated crystallization. The morphology induced by fractionated crystallization in immiscible blends could lead to enhanced plastic deformation during yielding of the matrix.

Keywords

Polymer Crystallization Differential Scanning Calorimetry Plastic Deformation Calorimetry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Morales
    • 1
  • M. L. Arnal
    • 1
  • A. J. Müller
    • 1
  1. 1.Grupo de Polímeros USB, Departamento de Mecánica y Departamento de Ciencia de los MaterialesUniversidad Simón BolívarCaracasVenezuela

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