Test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis (MANE) for the assessment of cancer chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting

  • C. L. M. CarnrikeJr.
  • Phillip J. Brantley
  • Barbara Bruce
  • Shaista Faruqui
  • Frank M. Gresham
  • Ray R. Buss
  • Thomas B. Cocke
Article

Abstract

The present study evaluated the concurrent validity of two assessment approaches for the measurement of cancer chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting. The results indicated that the concurrent validity between the Morrow Assessment of Nausea and Emesis (MANE; Morrow, 1984b) and continuous self-monitoring and the reliability on the MANE were moderate. The heterotrait-monomethod and heterotrait-heteromethod matrices demonstrated moderate correlations among the frequency, severity, and duration of anticipatory nausea and vomiting as well as high correlations among the frequency, severity, and duration of posttreatment nausea and vomiting. Additionally, the heterotrait-monomethod matrices show a number of correlations above chance between anticipatory and posttreatment symptoms. The results are discussed in light of future research endeavors.

Key words

reliability validity nausea vomiting cancer 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. L. M. CarnrikeJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  • Phillip J. Brantley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Barbara Bruce
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shaista Faruqui
    • 2
  • Frank M. Gresham
    • 1
  • Ray R. Buss
    • 1
  • Thomas B. Cocke
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton Rouge
  2. 2.Department of Family MedicineLouisiana State University School of MedicineBaton Rouge

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