The impact of confederate responsivity on social skills assessment

  • P. C. Moisan-Thomas
  • Judith Cohen Conger
  • Margaret Monroe Zellinger
  • Elizabeth A. Firth
Article

Abstract

The current investigation examined the degree to which judges' ratings of skill, anxiety, and attractiveness are influenced by the responsivity of the confederate. High-, medium-, and low-skilled subject-pool groupings, as well as self-referred clinical groups, were exposed to either a moderately or a minimally responsive confederate. Results indicated that subjects were rated as more skillful when interacting with a moderately responsive confederate than when interacting with a minimally responsive confederate. Further, there was a groups × condition interaction for anxiety ratings such that both the high- and the medium-skilled groups appeared more anxious under the minimal condition, whereas the low-skilled and self-referred groups did not. Self-referred subjects received significantly lower attractiveness ratings than did the high- or medium-skilled groups. Implications of these results and future directions for research are discussed.

Key words

social skills anxiety attractiveness role playing confederate responsivity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. C. Moisan-Thomas
    • 1
  • Judith Cohen Conger
    • 1
  • Margaret Monroe Zellinger
    • 1
  • Elizabeth A. Firth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychological SciencesPurdue UniversityWest Lafayette

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