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Mass spectrometric study of the pyrolysis of perfluorinated compounds of composition C6F12-C9F20, containing perfluoroisopropyl groups

  • N. D. Kagramanov
  • A. A. Kutin
  • E. I. Mysov
  • K. N. Makarov
  • L. L. Gervits
Physical Chemistry
  • 30 Downloads

Abstract

The primary and final products arising from the pyrolysis of perfluoro-2,4-dimethyl-3-ethylpentane, perfluoro-3-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-pentene, perfluoro-2-methyl-3-isopropyl-2-pentene, perfluoro-2,4-dimethyl-3-heptene, and perfluoro-4-methyl-2-pentene have been studied using low-energy mass spectrometry and chromatography-mass spectrometry. Thermal decomposition of hexafluoropropene oligomers, containing perfluoroisopropyl groups attached to a double bond, occurs via loss of a radical pair to form perfluorodienes, as well as via abstraction of a hexafluoropropene molecule from the iso-C3F7 group. A correlation between the principal fragmentation pathway observed under electron impact and the primary process in the main thermolysis pathway was detected only in the case of perfluoro-4-methyl-2-pentene and perfluoro-2,4-dimethyl-3-heptene, which are capable of cleavage of.CF3 and.C2F5 radicals, respectively, to give a single possible allyl radical structure.

Keywords

Pyrolysis Oligomer Thermal Decomposition Allyl Thermolysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. D. Kagramanov
    • 1
  • A. A. Kutin
    • 1
  • E. I. Mysov
    • 1
  • K. N. Makarov
    • 1
  • L. L. Gervits
    • 1
  1. 1.N. D. Zelinskii Institute of Organic ChemistryAcademy of Sciences of the USSRMoscow

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