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A Multitrait-multimethod examination of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI)

  • Leslie C. Morey
  • David J. Le Vine
Article

Abstract

Recently, certain Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) scales have seen increasing usage for the measurement of DSM-III personality disorders. The current study sought to identify the convergent and discriminant validity of these two sets of scales for this purpose. In general, the results indicated significant convergence across the two instruments. However, better convergent validity was found for scales representing those DSM-III disorders which are most consistent with the typology upon which the MCMI was based. In particular, convergent and discriminant validity results were poorest for Compulsive, Antisocial, and Passive-Aggressive personality scales.

Key words

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI) personality disorders 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie C. Morey
    • 1
  • David J. Le Vine
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVanderbilt UniversityNashville

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