Advertisement

Adjective self-descriptions of world war II and korean prisoner of war and combat veterans

  • Patricia B. Sutker
  • Bradley T. Thomason
  • Albert N. AllainJr.
Article

Abstract

Self-descriptions were generated among 71 former prisoners of war (POWs) and 35 combat veterans of similar ages, personal backgrounds, and war duty assignments using the Adjective Check List format. Former POWs differed significantly from combat controls in selection of self-descriptive identifiers across the 37 scales, specifically on Number of Favorable Adjectives Checked, Need Scales measuring Affiliation, Exhibition, Change, Succorance, and Abasement, Ideal Self and Counseling Readiness Topical Scales, four of five Transactional Analysis Scales, and the High Origence-High Intellectence Scale. Complementing previous findings, results point to an association between catastrophic trauma of sustained duration and subjective reports of relatively unfavorable views of self, less adaptive personality structure, and greater difficulties in coping.

Key words

former prisoners of war (POWs) Adjective Check List (ACL) response to trauma 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arthur, R. J. (1982). Psychiatric syndromes in prisoner of war and concentration camp survivors. In C. T. H. Friedman & R. A. Faguet (Eds.),Extraordinary disorders of human behavior (pp. 47–63). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  2. Beebe, G. W. (1975). Follow-up studies of World War II and Korean War prisoners. II. Morbidity, disability, and maladjustments.American Journal of Epidemiology, 101, 400–422.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Berne, E. (1961).Transactional analysis in psychotherapy. New York: Grove Press.Google Scholar
  4. Berne, E. (1966).Principles of group treatment. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Goldstein, G., van Kammen, W., Shelly, C., Miller, D. J., & van Kammen, D. P. (1987). Survivors of imprisonment in the Pacific Theater during World War II.American Journal of Psychiatry, 144, 1210–1213.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Gough, H. G., & Heilbrun, A. B. (1980).Manual for the Revised Adjective Check List. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.Google Scholar
  7. Hollingshead, A. B., & Redlich, F. C. (1958).Social class and mental illness. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  8. Keehn, R. J. (1980). Follow-up studies of World War II and Korean Conflict prisoners. III. Mortality to January 1, 1976.American Journal of Epidemiology, 111, 194–211.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Klonoff, H., Clark, C., Horgan, J., Kramer, P., & McDougal, G. (1976). The MMPI profile of prisoners of war.Journal of Clinical Psychology, 32, 623–627.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Kluznik, J. C., Speed, N., Van Valkenburg, C., & Magraw, R. (1986). Forty-year follow-up of United States prisoners of war.American Journal of Psychiatry, 143, 1443–1446.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Murray, H. A. (1938).Explorations in personality. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Nardini, J. (1952). Survival factors in American prisoners of war of the Japanese.American Journal of Psychiatry, 109, 241–248.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Nefzger, M. D. (1970). Follow-up studies of World War II and Korean War prisoners. 1. Study plan and mortality findings.American Journal of Epidemiology, 91, 123–138.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Solomon, Z., Garb, R., Bleich, A., & Grupper, D. (1987). Reactivation of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder.American Journal of Psychiatry, 144, 51–55.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Sutker, P. B., Winstead, D. K., Goist, K. C., Malow, R. M., & Allain, A. N. (1986). Psychopathology subtypes and symptom correlates among former prisoners of war.Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 8, 89–101.Google Scholar
  16. Sutker, P. B., Allain, A. N., & Motsinger, P. A. (1988). Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-derived psychopathology among former prisoners of war (POWs): Replication and extension.Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 10, 129–140.Google Scholar
  17. Teeter, R. A. (1985). Review of Adjective Check List. In J. V. Mitchell, Jr. (Ed.),The ninth mental measurements yearbook (pp. 50–52). Lincoln, Nebraska: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements, University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
  18. Ursano, R. J. (1981). The Viet Nam Era prisoner of war: Precaptivity personality and the development of psychiatric illness.American Journal of Psychiatry, 138, 315–318.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Ursano, R. J., Boydstun, J. A., & Wheatley, R. D. (1981). Psychiatric illness in U.S. Air Force Viet Nam prisoners of war.American Journal of Psychiatry, 138, 310–314.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Williams, K. B., & Williams, J. E. (1980). The assessment of transactional analysis ego states via the Adjective Check List.Journal of Personality Assessment, 44, 120–129.Google Scholar
  21. Zarske, J. A. (1985). Review of Adjective Check List. In J. V. Mitchell, Jr. (Ed.),The ninth mental measurements yearbook (pp. 52–53). Lincoln, Nebraska: Buros Institute of Mental Measurements, University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia B. Sutker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bradley T. Thomason
    • 1
    • 3
  • Albert N. AllainJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterNew Orleans
  2. 2.Tulane University School of MedicineNew Orleans
  3. 3.Louisiana State UniversityBaton Rouge

Personalised recommendations