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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 5–19 | Cite as

Resistance, counterresistance, and balance: A framework for managing the experience of impasse in psychotherapy

  • Paul M. Bernstein
  • Nemour M. Landaiche
Article

Abstract

Client resistance in psychotherapy although a healthy, expected and necessary phenomenon, may lead to an impasse when left unmanaged. Resistance takes numerous forms and occurs under many circumstances, but always for the purpose of client protection against the threat of change. Defensiveness and client rigidity lessen when the therapists provides a psychologically safe framework. The degree of client resistance varies in proportion to perceived danger and must be therapeutically confronted so as to enable the client to achieve flexible defensiveness and balance.

Keywords

Public Health Social Psychology Numerous Form Safe Framework Client Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. Bernstein
    • 1
  • Nemour M. Landaiche
  1. 1.Pittsburgh

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