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Electronic absorption spectra of the cyclopropyl aryl ethers

  • P. G. Sennikov
  • V. A. Kuznetsov
  • A. N. Egorochkin
  • S. M. Shostakovskii
  • A. A. Retinskii
Physical Chemistry
  • 19 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    Introduction of a chlorine atom between the cyclopropane and benzene rings in the cyclopropyl aryl ethers (CAE) leads to a marked increase in the1L a band intensities in the electronic absorption spectra of these compounds.

     
  2. 2.

    Comparison of the electronic absorption spectra of the CAE and certain model phenol and anisole derivatives indicates that the cyclopropane ring is involved, at least to a certain extent, in general conjugation chain of the electronically excited state.

     
  3. 3.

    The existence of a linear correlation between the frequency of the long-wave maximum in the electronic absorption spectrum and the charge-transfer frequency in the CAE and substituted phenols is indication of similarity in the electronic effects in the electronically excited states of these two types of compounds.

     

Keywords

Phenol Benzene Chlorine Excited State Linear Correlation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. G. Sennikov
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. A. Kuznetsov
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. N. Egorochkin
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. M. Shostakovskii
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. A. Retinskii
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of ChemistryAcademy of Sciences of the USSRGor'kii
  2. 2.Irkutsk Institute of Organic ChemistrySiberian Branch of the Academy of Sciences of the USSRUSSR

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