Low-dose radiation therapy for age-related macular degeneration

  • Harald Pöstgens
  • Stefan Bodanowitz
  • Peter Kroll
Clinical Investigation

Abstract

• Background: The study was carried out to evaluate the effect of low-dose radiation therapy in patients with age-related macular degeneration. • Methods: One hundred eyes of 78 patients (mean age 72 years) with different forms of age-related macular degeneration were treated with external beam radiotherapy between 1971 and 1989. In four fractions a total dose of 2 Gy was administered over 7 days. Radiation therapy was performed by the conventional 200-kV technique. The mean duration of follow-up period was 7 years (range 0.5 to 20 years). A control group was composed of 96 eyes from patients with AMD who received no therapy. The mean visual acuity at first presentation and the duration of follow-up was the same as in the treatment group. • Results: No difference in visual acuity between the treatment and control groups could be observed. After 1, 2, 5 and 10 years the mean visual acuity was equal in the radiation group and the control group. Even in subgroup analysis regarding only the eyes with exudative forms of AMD, no effect of this treatment strategy could be demonstrated. • Conclusion: Our results suggest that low-dose radiation therapy in patients with age-related macular degeneration has no beneficial effect. However, it must be considered that the dose of 2 Gy is low in comparison to doses used in recently published studies (5–24 Gy).

Keywords

Public Health Radiation Treatment Group Beneficial Effect Treatment Strategy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harald Pöstgens
    • 1
  • Stefan Bodanowitz
    • 1
  • Peter Kroll
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyPhilipps UniversityMarburgGermany

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