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Absorption as a therapeutic agent

Abstract

The process of absorption is therapeutically adaptive for patients in a variety of contexts. Absorption is defined as the temporary loss of self through immersion in an object that eventuates in self-enhancement. Patients who become absorbed in animate and/or inanimate objects are better able to cope with a variety of problems and experience a heightened sense of well-being. Absorption is distinguished from symbiosis, mystic experiences and religion. The recognition, validation and employment of absorption in the analytic session is elucidated.

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Hymer, S. Absorption as a therapeutic agent. J Contemp Psychother 14, 93–108 (1984). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00946308

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Therapeutic Agent
  • Temporary Loss
  • Inanimate Object