Advertisement

Reproducibility of plasma catecholamine concentrations at rest and during exercise in man

  • F. Péronnet
  • P. Blier
  • G. Brisson
  • P. Diamond
  • M. Ledoux
  • M. Volle
Article

Summary

The purpose of this study was to test the reproducibility of plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) concentrations, at rest and during exercise, in man. Twelve young men were evaluated on two occasions (one week apart) at rest in supine and sitting positions and during dynamic exercise on bicycle ergometer: 5 min at a low intensity workload (heart rate=131–133 bt min−1) and 5 and 20 min at a higher intensity (174–175 bt min−1). Mean plasma NE and E concentrations were not significantly different (p<0.05) on the two occasions in any of the experimental situations. However large within-subject variations were present, and the “standard errors of a single measurement” corrected for the variability of the catecholamine assay, ranged from 14 to 50% for NE and 14 to 37% for E. These results indicate that the mean plasma NE and E concentrations observed in a group of subjects are reproducible from one week to the other, but that individual plasma NE and E concentrations are not. This lack of reliability of a single determination of plasma catecholamine concentrations might be due to cyclic variations of plasma NE and E concentrations over time.

Key words

Epinephrine Norepinephrine Sympathetic system Exercise 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Astrand P-O, Ryhming I (1954) A nomogram for calculation of aerobic capacity from pulse rate during submaximal work. J Appl Physiol 7:218–223Google Scholar
  2. Dahlberg G (1948) Statistical methods for medical and biological students. Allen and Unwin Ltd, London, pp 124–125Google Scholar
  3. Galbo H (1981) Catecholamines and muscular exercise: assessment of sympathoadrenal activity. In: Poortmans J, Niset G (eds) Biochemistry of exercise II-B. University Park Press, Baltimore, pp 5–19Google Scholar
  4. Hanson BC, Schielke GP, Jen KLC, Wolfe RA, Movahed H, Pek SB (1982) Rapid fluctuations of catecholamines in monkeys under undisturbed conditions. Am J Physiol 242:E40-E46Google Scholar
  5. Hjemdahl P (1984a) Plasma catecholamines as markers for sympatho-adrenal activity in man. Acta Physiol Scand [Suppl] 527:1–54Google Scholar
  6. Hjemdahl P (1984b) Inter-laboratory comparison of plasma catecholamine determinations using several different assays. Acta Physiol Scand [Suppl] 527:43–54Google Scholar
  7. Lake CR, Ziegler MG, Kopin IJ (1976) Use of plasma norepinephrine for evaluation of sympathetic neuronal function in man. Life Sci 18:1315–1326Google Scholar
  8. Levin BE, Rappaport M, Natelson BH (1979) Ultradian variations of plasma noradrenaline in humans. Life Sci 25:621–628Google Scholar
  9. Levin BE, Natelson BJ (1980) The relation of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels over time in human. J Auton Nerv Syst 2:315–325Google Scholar
  10. Peuler JD, Johnson GA (1977) Simultaneous single isotope radioenzymatic assay of plasma norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine. Life Sci 21:625–636Google Scholar
  11. Tapp WN, Levin BE, Natelson BH (1981) Ultradian rhythm of plasma norepinephrine in rats. Endocrinology 109:1781–1783Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Péronnet
    • 1
  • P. Blier
    • 1
  • G. Brisson
    • 2
  • P. Diamond
    • 2
  • M. Ledoux
    • 1
  • M. Volle
    • 2
  1. 1.Département d'éducation physiqueUniversité de MontréalMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Université du Québec à Trois-RivièresTrois-RivièresCanada

Personalised recommendations