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Ascorbic acid and amino acid values in the aqueous humor of a patient with Lowe's syndrome

  • Seiji Hayasaka
  • Tetsuya Yamada
  • Koji Nitta
  • Yoshihiro Kaji
  • Shigeyoshi Hiraki
  • Kazuya Tachinami
  • Masayuki Matsumoto
  • Shuichi Yamamoto
  • Shuko Yamamoto
Clinical Investigation

Abstract

• Background: Aminoaciduria is found in Lowe's syndrome. No studies of concentrations of ascorbic acid and amino acids in the aqueous humor of the syndrome have been performed. We examined these concentrations in a patient with Lowe's syndrome. • Methods: Ascorbic acid and amino acid levels in the aqueous humor and plasma of a male infant were measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. The patient, who had congenital cataract, miotic pupils, opaque corneas, glaucoma, aminoaciduria, normal levels of ascorbic acid and amino acid in the plasma, and renal tubular acidosis, underwent trabeculotomy, lensectomy, and anterior vitrectomy in both eyes. • Results: Intraocular pressure in both eyes decreased to within the normal range, but both corneas remained opaque. The amino acid levels in the aqueous humor were similar to those in the plasma, but intracameral ascorbic acid levels were decreased. After topical instillation of ascorbic acid, the corneas became transparent. The proband's mother had good visual acuity but paracentral lens opacities in both eyes. His maternal grandmother had scattered cortical opacities in both lenses. • Conclusion: In this infant with Lowe's syndrome, we found intracameral levels of amino acids similar to those in the plasma. Levels of ascorbic acid in the aqueous humor were decreased.

Keywords

Ascorbic Acid Glaucoma Cataract Intraocular Pressure Aqueous Humor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seiji Hayasaka
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Yamada
    • 1
  • Koji Nitta
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Kaji
    • 1
  • Shigeyoshi Hiraki
    • 1
  • Kazuya Tachinami
    • 1
  • Masayuki Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Shuichi Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Shuko Yamamoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyToyama Medical and Pharmaceutical UniversityToyamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsToyama Medical and Pharmaceutical UniversityToyamaJapan

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