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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 91, Issue 1, pp 41–57 | Cite as

Physical and geochemical characteristics of suspended solids, Wilton Creek, Ontario

  • E. D. Ongley
  • M. C. Bynoe
Article

Abstract

To understand the nature of sediment-associated nutrient and contaminant transport dynamics in fluvial systems, a stormflow sampling program of suspended solids is reported for one water year in a representative rural diffuse source catchment of southeastern Ontario. Bulk samples of subsieve suspended solids were obtained using field-portable continuous-flow centrifuge apparatus. The physical and geochemical properties of suspended solids show no significant intersite differences over reaches of 1 500–2 000 m, yet display distinctive seasonal trends. Systematic seasonal changes in particle size, organic content, and Ca, P, Mn, Al, Ti, Fe, and K appear to reflect the changing role of partial area hydrology. Ca, P, and Mn are bioaccumulated by stream algae. Mineral signature is relatively constant over the year.

Keywords

biogeochemistry rivers sediment water quality 

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Copyright information

© National Research Council of Canada/Counseil national de recherches du Canada 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. D. Ongley
    • 1
  • M. C. Bynoe
    • 1
  1. 1.National Water Research Institute, Environment Canada501 University Cresc.WinnipegCanada

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