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American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 379–387 | Cite as

Ecological interventions and the process of change for prevention: Wedding theory and research to implementation in real world settings

  • Robert D. Felner
  • Ruby S. C. Phillips
  • David DuBois
  • A. Michele Lease
Articles
  • 84 Downloads

Keywords

Real World Social Psychology Health Psychology Real World Setting Ecological Intervention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert D. Felner
    • 1
  • Ruby S. C. Phillips
    • 1
  • David DuBois
    • 1
  • A. Michele Lease
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Government and Public AffairsUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana

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