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Effects of acetylcholine, carbachol, and mannitol on rabbit corneal endothelial function as assessed by corneal deturgescence

  • Ritsuko Akiyama
  • Kunyan Kuang
  • Pablo A. Chiaradía
  • Calvin W. Roberts
  • Jorge Fischbarg
Laboratory Investigation

Abstract

• Background: Anterior chamber miotic solutions are widely used in ophthalmic surgery to induce pupillary contraction. We investigated whether the acetylcholine, carbachol, or mannitol present in perfusing solutions can affect corneal endothelial function. • Methods: Freshly dissected deepithelized rabbit corneas were mounted in a Dikstein-Maurice chamber at 36 °C. The endothelial sides were perfused with six solutions: (A) 55 mM (1%) acetylcholine Cl plus modified balanced salts; (B) control for A, with acetylcholine Cl replaced by sucrose; (C) 0.55 mM (0.01%) carbachol Cl plus balanced salts; (D) balanced salts solution (BS; control for C); (E) 3% mannitol plus modified balanced salts; and (F) modified balanced salts (control for E, with mannitol replaced by sucrose). Corneal thickness was followed for 3 h in each experiment. The effect of solution E did not differ from that of solution F. • Results: The carbachol-containing solution produced a small increase in corneal thickness compared to the control solution, while the acetylcholine-containing solution resulted in corneal thickness lower than that in control preparations. • Conclusion: From these data, acetylcholine is harmless to the endothelium, and may actually stimulate its fluid pump mechanism. Carbachol, on the other hand, appears to have a detrimental effect.

Keywords

Sucrose Acetylcholine Mannitol Anterior Chamber Balance Salt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ritsuko Akiyama
    • 1
  • Kunyan Kuang
    • 1
  • Pablo A. Chiaradía
    • 1
  • Calvin W. Roberts
    • 2
  • Jorge Fischbarg
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyColumbia University, College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyCornell University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of PhysiologyColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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