Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 163, Issue 1–2, pp 71–79 | Cite as

Epicuticular wax alkanes ofEricaceae andEmpetrum from alpine and sub-alpine heaths in Austria

  • Inno Salasoo
Article

Abstract

Alkane distribution patterns were determined in the epicuticular wax of the leaves of 13 species and a hybrid fromEricaceae and one species ofEmpetrum (Empetraceae). As chemotaxonomic indicators, the results are of limited use only. The most uniform genus wasRhododendron, the most heterogeneousVaccinium. The dominant effect of genetic over environmental factors was apparent in most cases.

Key words

Angiosperms Ericaceae Arctostaphylos Arctous Calluna Erica Loiseleuria Rhododendron Rhodothamnus Oxycoccus Vaccinium Empetraceae Empetrum n-Alkanes epicuticular waxes chemotaxonomy environmental effects 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inno Salasoo
    • 1
  1. 1.School of ChemistryThe University of New South WalesKensingtonAustralia

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