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Parasitology Research

, Volume 75, Issue 4, pp 307–310 | Cite as

Observations on the lipids ofOochoristica agamae (Cestoda)

  • Siaka O. Aisien
  • Edward E. Ogiji
Original Investigations

Abstract

An investigation of the lipids ofOochoristica agamae, an anoplocephalid cestode of theAgama lizard, was undertaken. Total lipids of the parasite accounted for 8.4% of the fresh weight; neutral lipids comprised 82.98% of the total, glycolipids, 5.01%, and phospholipids, 12.03%. The major lipid classes inO. agamae include triglycerides, cholesterol, phosphatidyl choline, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. The 16-and 18-carbon fatty acids were predominant in the parasite. Hexadecenoic acid, usually found at low concentrations in the lipids of helminth parasites, was the most abundant of the 16-carbon fatty acids ofO. agamae (notably in the neutral lipid fraction). Although octadecatrienoic acid occurred only in trace amounts in the intestinal contents of the host, significant amounts of this fatty acid were detected in the parasite. A lack of 20-carbon fatty acids was determined in the lipids of the host's intestinal contents and the neutral lipid fraction of the parasite.O. agamae is suspected to be capable of modifying fatty acids obtained from dietary sources by chain elongation.

Keywords

Lipid Cholesterol Triglyceride Choline Phosphatidyl Choline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siaka O. Aisien
    • 1
  • Edward E. Ogiji
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of zoologyUniversity of BeninBenin CityNigeria

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