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Parasitology Research

, Volume 76, Issue 8, pp 689–691 | Cite as

Experimental infection of the leaf-monkey,Presbytis cristata, with subperiodicBrugia malayi

  • J. W. Mak
  • M. F. Choong
  • K. Suresh
  • P. L. W. Lam
Original Investigations

Abstract

Presbytis cristata monkeys infected through the inoculation of between 200 and 400 subperiodicBrugia malayi infective larvae (L3) in the right thight, in both thighs or in the dorsum of the right foot were followed up for varying periods of up to about 8 months after infection. All 148 inoculated animals became patient, with mean prepatent periods being between 66 and 76 days. In animals injected in the thigh, the patterns of microfilaraemia were similar, there being a rapid rise in the geometric mean counts (GMCs) of microfilariae during the first 10–12 weeks of patency, which then plateaued at levels of >1000/ml. Adult worm recovery, expressed as the percentage of the infective dose, was significantly higher in animals injected with 100 L3 in each thigh, being 9.4% as compared with 2.8%–4.8% in other groups. It is therefore recommended that animals should be injected with 100 L3 in each thigh and that the testing of potential filaricides in this model be carried out during the phase of rapid increase in microfilaraemia to ensure that any microfilaricidal effect can easily be detected.

Keywords

Adult Worm Experimental Infection Rapid Rise Infective Larva Infective Dose 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Buckley JJC, Edeson JFB (1956) On the adult morphology ofWuchereria sp. (malayi) from a monkeyMacaca irus and from cats in Malaya, and onWuchereria pahangi n. sp. from a dog and cat. J Helminthol 30: 1–20Google Scholar
  2. Laing ABG, Edeson JFB, Wharton RH (1960) Studies on filariasis in Malaya: the vertebrate hosts ofBrugia maluyi andBrugia pahangi. Ann Trop Med Parasitol 54: 92–99Google Scholar
  3. Laing ABG, Edeson JFB, Wharton RH (1961) Studies on filariasis in Malaya: further experiments on the transmission ofBrugia malayi andWuchereria bancrofti. Ann Trop Med Parasitol 55: 86–92Google Scholar
  4. Mak JW, Cheong WH, Yen PKF, Lim PKC, Chan WC (1982) Studies on the epidemiology of subperiodieBrugia malayi in Malaysia: problems in its control. Acta Trop 39: 237–245Google Scholar
  5. Mak JW, Sim BKL, Yen PKF (1984) Experimental infection of the leaf monkeyPresbytis melalophos with subperiodicBrugia malayi. Trop Biomed 1: 21–27Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Mak
    • 1
  • M. F. Choong
    • 1
  • K. Suresh
    • 1
  • P. L. W. Lam
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Medical ResearchKuala LumpurMalaysia

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