Zeitschrift für Parasitenkunde

, Volume 70, Issue 5, pp 637–654 | Cite as

Studies on larval trematodes infecting freshwater snails in Pakistan. X. Non-virgulate Xiphidiocercariae

  • Muhammad A. Haseeb
Original Investigations

Abstract

Eight new non-virgulate xiphidiocercariae from freshwater snails of Pakistan are described.Cercaria coheni sp. nov. has a spinose body and tail; two pairs of penetration glands, indistinguishable on the basis of their contents; a tegumental flap overhanging the anterior border of the acetabulum; 10–11 pairs of unidentified cells in the posterior half of the body; a V-shaped excretory bladder; and the flame cell formula 2[(1+1+1)+(1+1)]=10.C. craigi sp. nov. has a spinose body and tail; two pairs of penetration glands with similar contents; and a thick-walled, V-shaped excretory bladder.C. dalerkhani sp. nov. is very small; with a spinose body and tail; three pairs of penetration glands, the anterior two pairs with finely granular contents and the posterior pair with coarsely granular contents; and a bean-shaped excretory bladder.C. evelandi sp. nov. has a spinose body and an unspined tail; three pairs of penetration glands with similar contents; a roughly V-shaped excretory bladder; and the flame cell formula 2[(1+1+1)+(1+1)]=10.C. hemicaeca sp. nov. is characterized by a spinose body and an unspined tail; five pairs of penetration glands which are indistinguishable on the basis of their contents; numerous minute, lipid-like globules distributed throughout the body; an excretory bladder with a round base and wide apart cornua; and the flame cell formula 2[(1+1)+(1+1)]=8.C. friedi sp. nov. has a spined body and an unspined tail; five pairs of penetration glands with similar contents; oral sucker with a syncytial wall; an excretory bladder with a thick syncytial wall and a round base.C. nasiri sp. nov. has a spinose body and an unspined tail; ten pairs of penetration glands indistinguishable on the basis of their contents; an excretory bladder with a bean-shaped base and well developed cornua; and the flame cell formula 2[(2+2)+(2+2)]=16.C. manglaensis sp. nov. has a spinose body with several long, hair-like structures and an unspined tail bearing complete finfold; two pairs of penetration glands not differentiable on the basis of their contents; no gut beyond pharynx; a thick-walled excretory bladder with a round base and long cornua; and the flame cell formula 2[(1+1)+(1+1)]=8.

Keywords

Anterior Border Similar Content Oral Sucker Posterior Half Freshwater Snail 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ahmed Z, Khan I (1967) Studies on freshwater larval trematodes. Part I. A new xiphidiocercaria,C. chilyaensis from West Pakistan. Riv Parassitol 28:97–102Google Scholar
  2. Anderson GA, Martin GW, Pratt I (1966) The life cycle of the trematodeCephalouterina dicamptodoni Senger and Macy, 1953. J Parasitol 52:704–706Google Scholar
  3. Archibald RG, Marshall A (1932) A study of some cercariae obtained from molluscs in the Sudan. Parasitology 24:244–249Google Scholar
  4. Baugh SC (1954) Studies on larval flukes ofVivipara bengalensis. Part II. On a new xiphidiocercaria. J Zool Soc India 6:129–132Google Scholar
  5. Bhutta MS, Khan D (1974) Studies on the life cycle ofGaneo micracetabulus new species (Lecithodendriidae: Trematoda). Pakistan J Zool 6:111–121Google Scholar
  6. Brooks FG (1943) Larval treamtodes from Northwest Iowa. I. Nine new xiphidiocercariae. J Parasitol 29:330–339Google Scholar
  7. Cort WW (1914) Larval trematodes from North American freshwater snails. J Parasitol 1:65–84Google Scholar
  8. Cort WW (1915) Some North American larval trematodes. Illinois biol Monogr 1:1–87Google Scholar
  9. D'Rozario AM (1939) On four new species of cercariae. A contribution to Sewell's evolutionary scheme. Parasitology 31:285–298Google Scholar
  10. Dubois G (1929) Les cercaires de la région de Neuchâtel. Bull Soc neuchâtel Sci nat 53:1–177Google Scholar
  11. Fain A (1953) Contribution à l'etude des formes larvaires des trématodes au Congo belge et spécialement de la larva deSchistosoma mansoni. Mém Inst r Sci nat Belg 22:1–312Google Scholar
  12. Faust EC (1924) Notes on larval flukes from China. II. Studies on some larval flukes from the central and south coast China. Am J Hyg 4:241–301Google Scholar
  13. Ginetzinskaya TA, Dobrovolski AA (1968) Larval trematode fauna of freshwater molluscs of Delta of Volga. Part III. Furcocercariae (fam. Cyathocotylidae) and stylet cercariae (Xiphidiocercariae). Collection of helminthological works on Astrakhan reservoir 11:29–95Google Scholar
  14. Gold D, Lengy J (1974) Studies on larval stages of digenetic trematodes in aquatic molluscs of Israel. 4. One five cercariae from the freshwater snailMelanoides tuberculata (Muller, 1774). Isr J Zool 23:143–161Google Scholar
  15. Haseeb MA, Khan D (1984) Studies on larval trematodes infecting freshwater snails in Pakistan. IX. Virgulate Xiphidiocercariae. Proc Helminthol Soc Wash 51:(in press)Google Scholar
  16. Ismail NS, Abdel-Hafez SK (1983) Larval stages of digenetic trematodes ofMelanopsis praemorsa (L. 1758, Buccinum) (Thiaridae) snails from Yarmouk river, Jordan. Z Parasitenkd 69:613–626Google Scholar
  17. Ito J (1964) A monograph of cercariae in Japan and adjacent territories. Prog Med Parasitol Jpn 1:395–550Google Scholar
  18. Ito J (1977a) Studies on the fresh water cercariae in Leyte Island, Philippines. 3. Cercariae from Thiaridae. Jpn J Exp Med 47:223–248Google Scholar
  19. Ito J (1977b) Studies on the fresh water cercariae in Leyte Island, Philippines. 4. Cercariae from Viviparidae and Pilidae. Jpn J Exp Med 47:351–368Google Scholar
  20. Ito J, Blas BL (1978) Studies on fresh water cercariae in Layte Island, Philippines. 6. Cercariae from Lymnaeidae and Bulinidae. Jpn J Exp Med 48:1–16Google Scholar
  21. Ito J, Papasarathorn T, Tongkoom B (1962) Studies on cercariae from fresh water snails in Thailand. Jpn J Med Sci Biol 15:249–270Google Scholar
  22. Ito J, Yokogawa M, Hata H, Ibanez N, Miranda H, Guerra A (1982) Three new species of cercariae from a fresh water snail,Potamopyrgus mirandoi in endemic area of paragonimiasis, Condebamba, Peru. Jpn J Parasitol 31:339–346Google Scholar
  23. Jain SP, Pandey KC, Sharma SK (1982) A new xiphidiocercaria,Cercaria baniensis n.sp. from the snailVivipara bengalensis (Lamark). Riv Parassitol 43:17–20Google Scholar
  24. Khan D, Haseeb MA (1979) Studies on larval trematodes infecting freshwater snails in Pakistan. I.Cercaria buckleyi, a new xiphidiocercaria. Pakistan J Zool 11:225–230Google Scholar
  25. Lengy J, Gold D (1978) Studies on larval stages of digenetic trematodes in aquatic molluscs of Israel. V. Three cercariae from the freshwater snailBithynia sidoniensis. Isr J Zool 27:209–220Google Scholar
  26. Macy RW (1960) The life cycle ofPlagiorchis vespertilionis parorchis, n. ssp., (Trematoda: Plagiorchiidae), and observations on the effects of light on the emergence of cercariae. J Parasitol 46:337–345Google Scholar
  27. McCoy OR (1928) Life history studies on trematodes from Missouri. J Parasitol 14:207–228Google Scholar
  28. McMullen BD (1934) The life cycle of the turtle trematode,Cercorchis medius. J Parasitol 20:248–250Google Scholar
  29. Miller EL (1935) Studies on North American cercariae. J Parasitol 21:244–254Google Scholar
  30. Miller EL (1936) Studies on North American cercariae. Illinois biol Monogr 14:1–125Google Scholar
  31. Nasir P (1965) Studies on freshwater larval trematodes. Part I. A new species of microtylus xiphidiocercaria,Cercaria cumanensis, from Venezuela. Proc Helminthol Soc Wash 32:103–105Google Scholar
  32. Nasir P (1971) Freshwater larval trematodes. XXVIII. Three new species of cercariae. Proc Helminthol Soc Wash 38:206–210Google Scholar
  33. Nasir P, Acuna CA (1966) Studies on freshwater larval trematodes. Part VIII. Two new species of non-virgulate xiphidiocercariae from Venezuela. Zool Anz 176:291–296Google Scholar
  34. Nasir P, Diaz MT (1968) Studies on freshwater larval trematodes. Part XVI. Five new species of cercariae from Venezuela. Proc Helminthol Soc Wash 35:67–74Google Scholar
  35. O'Roke EC (1917) Larval trematodes from Kansas freshwater snails. Kans Univ Sci Bull 10:161–180Google Scholar
  36. Pandey KC, Shrivastava S (1970) On three new xiphidiocercariae fromLimnaea stagnalis (Linnaeus). Indian J Zootomy 11:129–135Google Scholar
  37. Porter A (1938) Larval trematodes found in certain South African molluscs, with special reference to schistosomiasis (Bilharziasis). Publs S Afr Inst Med Res 8:1–492Google Scholar
  38. Premvati (1953)Cercaria cruciata n.sp. (xiphidiocercaria) from the snail,Melanoides tuberculatus (Muller). Proc Nat Acad Sci India 23:39–45Google Scholar
  39. Probert AJ (1965) Studies on larval trematodes infecting freshwater molluscs of Llangorse Lake, South Wales. Part I. The Xiphidio- and Microcercous Cercariae. J Helminthol 39:35–52Google Scholar
  40. Ryšavý B, Ergens R, Groschaft J, Yousif F, El Hassan AA (1975) Larval trematode stages in watersnails from the area of Warak El Arab (A.R.E.). Vest Cs spol zool 39:135–153Google Scholar
  41. Sewell RBS (1922) Cercariae Indicae. Indian J Med Res 10 (Suppl.):1–370Google Scholar
  42. Sewell RBS (1931) Cercariae nicobaricae. Indian J Med Res 18:785–806Google Scholar
  43. Southwell T (1930) Cestoda. I. In:The fauna of British India including Ceylon and Burma. Taylor and Francis, LondonGoogle Scholar
  44. Tubangui MA (1928) Larval trematodes from Philippine snails. Philipp J Sci 36:37–54Google Scholar
  45. Wesenberg-Lund C (1934) Contributions to the development of the Trematoda Digenea. Part II. The biology of the freshwater cercariae in Danish freshwaters. K danske Vidensk Selsk Skr 5:1–223Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammad A. Haseeb
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyState University of New York, Downstate Medical CenterBrooklynUSA

Personalised recommendations