Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

, Volume 135, Issue 1, pp 109–112 | Cite as

Renal handling of Ca2+ in diabetes

  • Pallab K. Ganguly
  • Animesh Sahai
Article

Abstract

Ca2+ transport in kidney has gained considerable attention in the recent past. Our laboratory has been involved in understanding the regulatory mechanisms underlying Ca2+ transport in the kidney across the renal basolateral membrane. We have shown that ANP, a cardiac hormone, mediates its biological functions by acting on its receptors in the kidney basolateral membrane. Furthermore, it has been established that ANP receptors are coupled with Ca2+ ATPase, the enzyme that participates in the vectorial translocation of Ca2+ from the tubular lumen to the plasma. It is possible that a defect in the ANP-receptor-effector system in diabetes (under certain conditions such as hypertension) may be associated with abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis and the development of nephropathy. Accordingly, future studies are needed to establish this hypothesis.

Key words

Ca2+ATPase Ca2+ homeostasis Ca2+transport Kidney cortex 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pallab K. Ganguly
    • 1
  • Animesh Sahai
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, St. Boniface General Hospital Research Centre, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada

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