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Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry

, Volume 145, Issue 1, pp 29–37 | Cite as

A glycoprotein multimer fromBacillus thuringiensis sporangia: Dissociation into subunits and sugar composition

  • M. García-Patrone
  • Juana S. Tandecarz
Article

Abstract

Two glycoproteins (205 and 72 kDa) were found inBacillus thuringiensis sporangia. They were predominantly localized in the exosporium and/or the spore coat, although a small proportion was also found in membranes. A method for the dissociation of hydrophobic aggregates that resist the usual conditions of SDS-PAGE is described. Using this method we established that the 205 kDa glycoprotein is a multimer of the 72 kDa one. Deglycosylation of the 205 kDa and 72 kDa glycoproteins with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid yielded a 54 kDa polypeptide in both cases. At least three species of oligosaccharides were O-glycosidically linked to serines of the 54 kDa polypeptide chain. One of the oligosaccharides had N-acetylgalactosamine at the reducing end, rhamnose and a component not yet identified.

Key Words

Bacillus thuringiensis sporangium glycoprotein dissociation oligosaccharides 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. García-Patrone
    • 1
  • Juana S. Tandecarz
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas ‘Fundación Campomar’Buenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.Instituto de Inverstigaciones Bioquímicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y NaturalesUniversidad de Buenos AiresArgentina
  3. 3.Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquímicas Buenos AiresCONICETArgentina

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