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Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 181–185 | Cite as

Characterization of hapten-human serum albumins and their complexes with specific human antisera

  • Roy Patterson
  • Irena M. Suszko
  • C. Raymond Zeiss
  • Jacob J. Pruzansky
Original Articles

Abstract

Human antisera against trimellityl-human serum albumin or diphenylmethane diisocyanate-human serum albumin were fractionated by Sephadex G200. The fractions containing IgG were pooled and reacted with trimellityl125I-human serum albumin or diphenylmethane diisocyanate-125I-human serum albumin, and these mixtures were again fractionated through Sephadex G200. The resultant chromatographic profiles showed two peaks. The first peak contained hapten-human serum albumin-antibody as demonstrated by the precipitability of radioactivity with anti-human IgG. During these studies it was found that trimellityl-human serum albumin or diphenylmethane diisocyanate-human serum albumin have different elution profiles and electrophoretic mobilities than human serum albumin. Trimellityl-human serum albumin elutes earlier and migrates farther toward the anode than either diphenylmethane diisocyante-human serum albumin or human serum albumin. Diphenylmethane diisocyanate-human serum albumin elutes earlier and migrates farther toward the anode than human serum albumin. These results may be explained by swelling of the trimellityl-human serum albumin molecule due to the additional negative charges of the trimellityl carboxyl groups and loss of positive charges at basic amino acid binding sites of trimellityl. The lesser changes in diphenylmethane diisocyanate-human serum albumin may result from only the deletion of positive charges on basic amino acids of human serum albumin since diphenylmethane diisocyanate contributes no additional charge.

Key words

Hapten-protein antigen-antibody complexes fractionation immunologic disease 

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References

  1. 1.
    Zeiss CR, Patterson R, Pruzansky JJ, Miller MM, Rosenberg R, Levitz D: Trimellitic anhydride-induced airway syndromes. Clinical and immunologic studies. J Allergy Clin Immunol 60:96–103, 1977Google Scholar
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    Patterson R, Zeiss CR, Roberts M, Pruzansky JJ, Wolkonsky P, Chacon R: Human antihapten antibodies in trimellitic anhydride (TMA) inhalation reactions: Immunoglobulin classes of anti TMA antibodies and hapten inhibition studies. J Clin Invest 62:971–978, 1978Google Scholar
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    Patterson R, Addington W, Banner A, Byron GE, Franco M, Herbert FA, Nicotra MB, Pruzansky JJ, Roberts M, Rivera M, Yawn D, Zeiss CR: Antihapten antibodies in workers exposed to trimellitic anhydride fumes: A potential immunopathogenic mechanism for the trimellitic anhydride pulmonary disease-anemia syndrome. Am Rev Resp Dis 120:1259–1267, 1979Google Scholar
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    Turner E, Pruzansky JJ, Patterson R, Zeiss CR, Roberts M: Detection of antibodies in human serum using trimellityl-erythrocytes: Direct and indirect hemagglutination and hemolysis. J Clin Exp Immunol 39:470–476, 1980Google Scholar
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    Zeiss CR, Metzger WJ, Levitz D: Quantitative relationships between IgE antibody and blocking antibodies specific for antigen E in patients given immunotherapy with ragweed antigen E. Clin Exp Immunol 28:250–255, 1977Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy Patterson
    • 1
  • Irena M. Suszko
    • 1
  • C. Raymond Zeiss
    • 1
  • Jacob J. Pruzansky
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Allergy-Immunology, Department of MedicineNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicago

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