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International Ophthalmology

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 47–51 | Cite as

Etiology of corneal opacification in central Tanzania

  • Peter A. Rapoza
  • Sheila K. West
  • Sidney J. Katala
  • Beatriz Munoz
  • Hugh R. Taylor
Section: Geographical Ophthalmology

Abstract

The frequency and causes of visually significant corneal opacification in central Tanzania was assessed by a population-based survey. The overall prevalence of bilateral corneal opacification was 1.16% (95% CI 0.31–1.44) and unilateral corneal opacification was 2.07% (95% CI 1.55–2.73). Bilateral corneal opacification was most frequently associated with trachoma, keratoconjunctivitis, vitamin A deficiency and measles. Unilateral corneal opacification had similar causes with the addition of cases caused by trauma. Corneal scarring is a frequent occurence in this region. The majority of cases of corneal opacification are secondary to potentially preventable or treatable causes.

Key words

blindness corneal opacification keratoconjunctivitis measles trachoma vitamin A deficiency 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Rapoza
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  • Sheila K. West
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sidney J. Katala
    • 2
    • 4
  • Beatriz Munoz
    • 3
    • 4
  • Hugh R. Taylor
    • 3
    • 5
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Helen Keller International, Inc.New York
  3. 3.Dana Center for Preventive Ophthalmology, The Wilmer Institute and The School of Public HealthThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore
  4. 4.WHO Collaborative Center for the Prevention of BlindnessUSA
  5. 5.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of MelbourneAustralia

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