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Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 152–158 | Cite as

Suppression of immunoglobulin production of lymphocytes by intravenous immunoglobulin

  • Naomi Kondo
  • Takeshi Ozawa
  • Kyosuke Mushiake
  • Fumiaki Motoyoshi
  • Tsukako Kameyama
  • Kimiko Kasahara
  • Hideo Kaneko
  • Manabu Yamashina
  • Yoshihiro Kato
  • Tadao Orii
Original Articles

Abstract

The proliferative responses and the immunoglobulin production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to pokeweed mitogen were dose-dependently suppressed by sulfonated intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), polyethylene glycol-treated IVIG, pH 4-treated IVIG, or human γ-globulin, but they were not or only slightly suppressed by human serum albumin or pepsin-treated IVIG. Moreover, the suppression of immunoglobulin production by sulfonated IVIG, polyethylene glycol-treated IVIG, or pH 4-treated IVIG was seen in the cases in which B cells preincubated with IVIGs were cocultured with T cells and monocytes preincubated with or without IVIGs and in the cases in which monocytes preincubated with IVIGs were cocultured with T cells and B cells preincubated with or without IVIGs. However, in the cases in which only T cells were preincubated with IVIGs, immunoglobulin production was not suppressed. The suppression of the monocyte function by IVIGs tended to be less than the suppression of the B-cell function by IVIGs. Moreover, the suppression by IVIGs was blocked by antihuman IgG Fc. Our results suggest that IVIGs suppress the immunoglobulin production of lymphocytes through suppression of the B-cell function and the antigen presenting-cell function by attachment of IVIGs to Fc receptors of B-cell membranes and antigen presenting-cell membranes.

Key words

Intravenous immunoglobulin B cells monocytes immunoglobulin production 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naomi Kondo
    • 1
  • Takeshi Ozawa
    • 1
  • Kyosuke Mushiake
    • 1
  • Fumiaki Motoyoshi
    • 1
  • Tsukako Kameyama
    • 1
  • Kimiko Kasahara
    • 1
  • Hideo Kaneko
    • 1
  • Manabu Yamashina
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Kato
    • 1
  • Tadao Orii
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsGifu University School of MedicineGifuJapan

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