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Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 108–113 | Cite as

Distinctive patterns of release of neuroendocrine peptides after nasal challenge of allergic subjects with ryegrass antigen

  • Kay B. Walker
  • Maria H. Serwonska
  • Frank H. Valone
  • W. Scott Harkonen
  • Oscar L. Frick
  • Kirsten H. Scriven
  • William D. Ratnoff
  • Judith G. Browning
  • Donald G. Payan
  • Edward J. Goetzl
Original Articles

Abstract

The concentrations of the neuropeptides substance P, somatostatin, and calcitonin gene-related peptide in human nasal secretions were quantified by radioimmunoassays, concurrently with that of histamine, in the course of nasal challenge of allergic and control subjects with ryegrass antigen to examine contributions of neuromediation of the tissue response. Each of theneuropeptides and histamine were detected in nasal lavage fluid prior to challenge. In allergic patients, but not normal controls, antigen evoked significant increases of 3-fold in histamine at 15–60 min, 1.5- to 4-fold in calcitonin gene-related peptide at 15 min-24 hr, and more than 2-fold in somatostatin at 6 hr, without altering the concentration of substance P in nasal lavage fluid. The identity of the neuropeptides was confirmed chromatographically. Thus calcitonin gene-related peptide may mediate nasal congestion directly and somatostatin may be one of the factors regulating the late involvement of basophils and mast cells in allergic rhinitis.

Key words

Neuropeptides neuroimmunology somatostatin calcitonin gene-related peptide allergy 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kay B. Walker
    • 1
  • Maria H. Serwonska
    • 2
  • Frank H. Valone
    • 3
  • W. Scott Harkonen
    • 2
  • Oscar L. Frick
    • 1
  • Kirsten H. Scriven
    • 2
  • William D. Ratnoff
    • 2
  • Judith G. Browning
    • 2
  • Donald G. Payan
    • 2
  • Edward J. Goetzl
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco
  2. 2.Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology-ImmunologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco
  3. 3.Veterans Administration Medical CenterSan Francisco

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