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Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 178–187 | Cite as

In vitro T-cell functions specific to an anti-DNA idiotype and serological markers in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

  • S. Mendlovic
  • Y. Shoenfeld
  • R. Bakimer
  • R. Segal
  • M. Dayan
  • E. Mozes
Original Articles

Abstract

The human monoclonal autoantibody 16/6 is a common anti-DNA idiotype found to have clinical relevance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therefore the ability of peripheral blood T cells of SLE patients and healthy controls to proliferate and to produce helper T-cell factors following stimulation with this idiotype was tested. It was found that T cells of 75% of healthy donors proliferated to the 16/6 idiotype, whereas only 22% of SLE patients responded to this idiotype by proliferation. On the other hand, the capability to produce T-cell helper factors specific to the 16/6 idiotype was found in a higher percentage of SLE patients (48%) as compared to healthy controls (31%). The low frequency of proliferative responses in SLE patients might be due either to the chronic exposure to the 16/6 idiotype or to the production of antiidiotype antibodies against the 16/6 idiotype, which interfere with the response to the latter stimulator.

Key words

Systemic lupus erythematosus anti-DNA idiotype T-cell proliferation T-cell helper factors 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Mendlovic
    • 1
  • Y. Shoenfeld
    • 2
  • R. Bakimer
    • 2
  • R. Segal
    • 3
  • M. Dayan
    • 1
  • E. Mozes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical ImmunologyThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael
  2. 2.Research Unit of Autoimmune Diseases, Carob Research Center Department of Medicine D, Soroka Medical Center, Faculty of Health SciencesBen-Gurion UniversityBeer-ShevaIsrael
  3. 3.Department of RheumatologyIchilov HospitalTel AvivIsrael

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