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Human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells lack catalase activity and are susceptible to hydrogen peroxide

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Abstract

5Cr release as lytic and cell detachment as nonlytic injury were employed to estimate neutrophil-mediated injury of cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. The reagents hydrogen peroxide or hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase produced dose-dependent killing and nonlytic cell detachment, which were specifically inhibited by catalase but not by superoxide dismutase. The concentration of hydrogen peroxide or xanthine oxidase to induce cell detachment was less than lytic dose, suggesting that cell detachment was a much more sensitive assay of injury. Neutrophil-mediated cell lysis averaged 15% at most and was mostly dependent on hydrogen peroxide, while neutrophil-mediated cell detachment was nearly 100% and its dependency on hydrogen peroxide varied from 46% to 60%. These results suggest that vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells in neutrophil-mediated events are destroyed by a hydrogen peroxide-dependent process, mainly via a nonlytic cell detachment mechanism. There was no striking difference of sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide between vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Vascular smooth muscle ceils and endothelial cells contained fairly high concentrations of superoxide dismutase, but not catalase, activity. The sensitivity of these cells to hydrogen peroxide but not to superoxide may arise from the fact that these cells lack intracellular catalase activity. The injury of vascular cells, which constitute important components of blood vessels, may lead to vascular injury and subsequent tissue damage.

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Shingu, M., Yoshioka, K., Nobunaga, M. et al. Human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells lack catalase activity and are susceptible to hydrogen peroxide. Inflammation 9, 309–320 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00916279

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